> Apprenticeship

Description

This is an excellent program for those individuals who have an interest in expanding their knowledge as it relates to their individual trade. Areas of emphasis are national and state code, material requirements, practical mathematics required in the trade, and other essential subject areas.

Apprenticeships available: Electrician, HVAC, Automation Maintenance, Machinist, Plumbing, and Other (upon request).

Apprenticeship programs are composed of two parts: (1) on-the-job training provided by a sponsor who exposes the apprentice to practical applications in all phases of a particular craft, and (2) classroom-related instruction designed to provide the apprentice with knowledge of theoretical and technical aspects of their craft. Total completion of an apprenticeship program will take up to four years, depending upon the craft.

BATC provides classroom-related and supplemental instruction for apprenticeship programs. BATC neither provides on-the-job training nor acts as a sponsor for apprentices. Individuals must locate their own sponsors. For individual industry-sponsored programs, a student should contact their employer's training director or the Apprenticeship Office. For additional information concerning the listed apprenticeship programs, please contact the Apprenticeship Office at (435) 750-3255.

Apprentices must register with the Utah State Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing, (801) 530-6628 or (801) 530-6436; dpl.utah.gov. The State of Utah rules can be viewed through the link: State of Utah Licensing - Electrical or State of Utah Licensing - Plumbing

The programs are divided into two 90-hour sessions beginning in September and ending in December, then beginning again in January and ending in April.

For more information, see the Apprenticeship Enrollment Packet in the Downloads section at the bottom.

Quick Facts:

Location(s)

West Campus (Logan)

Estimated Tuition & Fees:

$310/Semester - this is an estimate. Course fees may vary.

Duration:

4 years

Estimated Monthly Payment:

Tuition is due upon enrollment.

Pell Grant Eligible:

No

Estimated Books and Supplies:

Electrician: $1,300
Plumbing: $700
HVAC: $700

Click here for books and supplies details (ISBN/edition).Textbook details (ISBN/edition) are available to registered students through the online student portal.

Availability:

Plumbing: Mon. and Wed. evenings
Electrician and HVAC: Tues. and Thurs. evenings.

Special Requirements:

Individuals must be at least 16 years old to begin an apprenticeship program. Students younger than 18 years old must be registered with the Office of Apprenticeship. Students may complete up to two years of an apprenticeship program while completing their high school graduation requirements.

To increase the opportunity for success in BATC apprenticeship programs, apprentices must take BATC's assessment test prior to enrolling in the program. (Basic reading, math, and measurements.) Math is required for all apprentices in Utah.

Please Note: A composite ACT score of 17 or a composite SAT score of 1210 can waive assessment requirements if taken no more than four years prior to enrollment.

Outcome Data:

Reported Annually to the Accrediting Agency Council on Occupational Education
Completion: 65%
Job Placement: 100%
Withdrawal: 35%
License required for Journeyman level - State of Utah Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing

Outcome statistics are compiled annually based upon Training Outcome surveys conducted with students post-graduation. Data is gathered through coordination with the student, faculty, Student Services Office personnel, and licensing agencies.



Employment Outlook

Apprentice Electrician

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (www.bls.gov) average employment growth is expected. Job prospects should be very good, particularly for workers with the widest range of skills, including voice, data, and video wiring.

Employment of electricians should increase 7 percent between 2006 and 2016, about as fast as the average for all occupations. As the population and economy grow, more electricians will be needed to install and maintain electrical devices and wiring in homes, factories, offices, and other structures. An increase in power plant construction over the next ten years will require many additional electricians. New technologies also are expected to continue to spur demand for these workers. For example, buildings increasingly need wiring to accommodate computers and telecommunications equipment. Robots and other automated manufacturing systems in factories also will require the installation and maintenance of more complex wiring systems. As the economy rehabilitates and retrofits older structures, which usually require electrical improvements to meet modern codes, it will create additional jobs.

In addition to jobs created by the increased demand for electrical work, many openings are expected over the next decade as a large number of electricians retire. This will create very good job opportunities, especially for those with the widest range of skills, including voice, data, and video wiring. Job openings for electricians will vary by location and specialty, however, and will be best in the fastest growing regions of the country, especially those areas where power plants are being constructed. Employment of electricians, like that of many other construction workers, is sensitive to the fluctuations of the economy. Workers in these trades may experience periods of unemployment when the overall level of construction falls. On the other hand, shortages of these workers may occur in some areas during peak periods of building activity.

Although employment of maintenance electricians is steadier than that of construction electricians, those working in the automotive and other manufacturing industries that are sensitive to cyclical swings in the economy may experience lay offs during recessions. In addition, opportunities for maintenance electricians may be limited in many industries by the increased contracting out for electrical services in an effort to reduce operating costs. However, increased job opportunities for electricians in electrical contracting firms should partially offset job losses in other industries.

Apprentice Plumbing

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (www.bls.gov) average employment growth is projected. Job opportunities are expected to be very good, especially for workers with welding experience.

Employment of pipelayers, plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters is expected to grow 10 percent between 2006 and 2016, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Demand for plumbers will stem from new construction and building renovation. Bath remodeling, in particular, is expected to continue to grow and create more jobs for plumbers. In addition, repair and maintenance of existing residential systems will keep plumbers employed. Demand for pipefitters and steamfitters will be driven by maintenance and construction of places such as powerplants, water and wastewater treatment plants, office buildings, and factories, with extensive pipe systems. Growth of pipelayer jobs will stem from the building of new water and sewer lines and pipelines to new oil and gas fields. Demand for sprinklerfitters will increase because of changes to State and local rules for fire protection in homes and businesses.

Job opportunities are expected to be very good, as demand for skilled pipelayers, plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters is expected to outpace the supply of workers well trained in this craft in some areas. Some employers report difficulty finding workers with the right qualifications. In addition, many people currently working in these trades are expected to retire over the next 10 years, which will create additional job openings. Workers with welding experience should have especially good opportunities. Traditionally, many organizations with extensive pipe systems have employed their own plumbers or pipefitters to maintain equipment and keep systems running smoothly. But, to reduce labor costs, many of these firms no longer employ full-time, in-house plumbers or pipefitters. Instead, when they need a plumber, they rely on workers provided under service contracts by plumbing and pipefitting contractors.

Construction projects generally provide only temporary employment. When a project ends, some pipelayers, plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters may be unemployed until they can begin work on a new project, although most companies are trying to limit these periods of unemployment to retain workers. In addition, the jobs of pipelayers, plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters are generally less sensitive to changes in economic conditions than jobs in other construction trades. Even when construction activity declines, maintenance, rehabilitation, and replacement of existing piping systems, as well as the increasing installation of fire sprinkler systems, provide many jobs for pipelayers, plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters.

Apprentice HVAC

Employment of heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers is projected to increase 9 percent during the 2006-16 decade, as fast as the average for all occupations. As the population and stock of buildings grows, so does the demand for residential, commercial, and industrial climate-control systems. Residential HVACR systems generally need replacement after 10 to 15 years; the large number of homes built in recent years will enter this replacement timeframe by 2016. The increased complexity of HVACR systems, which increases the possibility that equipment may malfunction, also will create opportunities for service technicians. A growing focus on improving indoor air quality and the increasing use of refrigerated equipment by a growing number of stores and gasoline stations that sell food should also create more jobs for heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration technicians.

Concern for the environment has prompted the development of new energy-saving heating and air-conditioning systems. An emphasis on better energy management should lead to the replacement of older systems and the installation of newer, more efficient systems in existing homes and buildings. Also, demand for maintenance and service work should increase as businesses and homeowners strive to keep increasingly complex systems operating at peak efficiency. Regulations prohibiting the discharge and production of older types of refrigerants that pollute the atmosphere should continue to result in the need to replace many existing air conditioning systems or to modify them to use new environmentally safe refrigerants. The pace of replacement in the commercial and industrial sectors will quicken if Congress or individual States change tax rules designed to encourage companies to buy new HVACR equipment.

Job prospects for heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers are expected to be excellent, particularly for those who have completed training from an accredited technical school or a formal apprenticeship. Job opportunities should be best in the fastest growing areas of the country. A growing number of retirements of highly skilled technicians are expected to generate many job openings. Many contractors have reported problems finding enough workers to meet the demand for service and installation of HVACR systems.

Technicians who specialize in installation work may experience periods of unemployment when the level of new construction activity declines, but maintenance and repair work usually remains relatively stable. People and businesses depend on their climate-control or refrigeration systems and must keep them in good working order, regardless of economic conditions.

Apprentice Machining

Employment of machinists is projected to decline slowly by 3 percent over the 2006-16 decade because of rising productivity among these workers and strong foreign competition in the manufacture of goods. Machinists will become more efficient as a result of the expanded use of and improvements in technologies such as CNC machine tools, autoloaders, and high-speed machining. This allows fewer machinists to accomplish the same amount of work. Technology is not expected to affect the employment of machinists as significantly as that of some other production workers, however, because machinists monitor and maintain many automated systems. Due to modern production techniques, employers prefer workers, such as machinists, who have a wide range of skills and are capable of performing almost any task in a machine shop.

Despite the projected decline in employment, job opportunities for machinists should continue to be good as employers value the wide-ranging skills of these workers. Also, many young people with the necessary educational and personal qualifications needed to become machinists prefer to attend college or may not wish to enter production occupations. Therefore, the number of workers learning to be machinists is expected to be less than the number of job openings arising each year from the need to replace experienced machinists who retire or transfer to other occupations.

Employment levels in this occupation are influenced by economic cycles; as the demand for machined goods falls, machinists involved in production may be laid off or forced to work fewer hours. Employment of machinists involved in plant maintenance, however, often is more stable because proper maintenance and repair of costly equipment remains critical to manufacturing operations, even when production levels fall.

Online/E-learning Components

This specialization is delivered face-to-face and may contain online components.

What others are saying

"I gained a lot of skills to make me more valuable to my employers. Thanks!"

-Graduate

July 22, 2014